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The Federal Eviction Prevention Programme Has Been Increased to $20 Million!

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In order to afford legal aid for tenants who choose to remain in their homes after being evicted, the Department of Housing and Urban Development is expanding its eviction protection program by a factor of two.

The $20 million HUD award, which was announced on Monday, will not provide any form of direct rental assistance; rather, it will finance legal services and counsel for families who are facing eviction.

The money will be given through the Eviction Protection Grant Program to 11 nonprofit groups and government agencies, with grants ranging in value from $1 million to $2.4 million. The monies will be disbursed through the Eviction Protection Grant Program.

Pine Tree Legal Assistance, based in Portland, Maine, and the city of San Antonio, Texas, are among the organizations that have benefited from the latest round of financing.

The Federal Eviction Prevention Programme Has Been Increased to $20 Million!

The Eviction Protection Grant Program was inaugurated by the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) in November, with an initial grant of $20 million allocated to ten legal service providers.

Secretary of Housing and Urban Development Marcia Fudge described the increased financing as a “doubling down” on a tried-and-true way of mitigating financial damage caused by the COVID-19 outbreak.

“We must continue to do all in our power to assist people in maintaining high-quality homes,” Fudge said in a statement. “We know that having access to legal assistance and participating in eviction diversion programs are effective. It assists people in avoiding eviction and protects the rights of tenants.”

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According to Fudge, the funds can also be used to assist landlords in obtaining emergency rental assistance, as well as to help minimize the number of cases being heard in eviction courts across the country.

According to the government, the award program is designed to benefit individuals of color, who are disproportionately represented among those who have been evicted, as well as tenants with limited English proficiency and persons with disabilities.

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