Texas Resident Who Swam in Austin Lake Dies from Brain-Eating Amoeba

texas-resident-who-swam-in-austin-lake-dies-from-brain-eating-amoeba

After bathing in a lake close to Austin, a Texas citizen passed away from a brain-eating amoeba.

Naegleria fowleri, which kills 99 percent of those it infects, was discovered in the unnamed patient earlier this month. 

Local health authorities admitted to swimming in Lake Lyndon B. Johnson and warned others to stay out of warm water because it might be contaminated with the fatal amoeba.

The patient is believed to be at least the fourth US victim of the amoeba this year, following the deaths of a resident in Georgia, a two-year-old boy in Nevada, and a man in Florida.

Although these diseases are extremely uncommon, they serve as a crucial reminder that natural bodies of water contain bacteria that might increase the risk of infection, according to Dr. Desmar Walkes, a health official with the Austin-Travis County Department of Health.

When water gets up a person’s nose, which can happen during swimming, diving, or by submerging the head in water, the amoeba can be contracted.

Although the amoeba starts the infection in the nasal passageway, it eventually moves through nerves to the brain, where it usually results in death.

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Symptoms and Preventive Measures: Recent Cases in Texas and Georgia

texas-resident-who-swam-in-austin-lake-dies-from-brain-eating-amoeba
After bathing in a lake close to Austin, a Texas citizen passed away from a brain-eating amoeba.

Mild symptoms, which start about five days after infection and include headaches, fevers, nausea, and vomiting, are initially experienced by patients.

However, they soon advance to more severe warning signals such as confusion, hallucinations, loss of balance, and seizures.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), patients often pass away five days after their symptoms start.

One of the best methods to prevent the disease, according to health professionals, is to avoid swimming in warm freshwater bodies that may contain the bacteria.

They also suggest utilizing nose clips or raising head above the water to reduce the amount of water that enters the nose.

This incident occurs around a month after a person in Georgia passed away as a result of being infected with the brain-eating amoeba.

The person, who was also unidentified, was thought to have picked up the amoeba while swimming in a freshwater pond or lake.

Over the weekend, the Georgia Department of Health made public the case and issued a warning against swimming in warm water. 

 Read Also: NHS Waiting List Deaths: 120,000 NHS Patients Died as Treatment Delays Mount

Source: Daily Mail

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