Taiwan Gears Up for Typhoon Haikui: Work, Transport, and Classes Come to a Halt

taiwan-gears-up-for-typhoon-haikui-work-transport-and-classes-come-to-a-halt

Taiwan suspended flights, rail transport, and ferry services, as well as classes and outdoor events, and officials implored employees to remain at home as the island prepared for the arrival of Typhoon Haikui on Sunday evening.

The storm’s approach occurred as Typhoon Saola continued to diminish while moving along the Chinese coast, where 900,000 people and 80,000 fishing vessels had been evacuated to safety and the majority of Hong Kong and portions of the mainland’s coastal regions had shut down businesses, transportation, and institutions.

However, damage appeared to be minimal, and most restrictions were lifted by Sunday.

Dozens of domestic flights, as well as flights to Hong Kong and Macau, were canceled as a result of the effects of Haikui’s heavy rain and high winds on Taiwan. The typhoon had maximum sustained winds of 137 kilometers per hour (85 miles per hour) and surges of up to 173 kilometers per hour (107 miles per hour), according to the island’s meteorological bureau.

A hot air balloon festival in the central Taichung region, several outdoor concerts, art events, and a baseball festival were among the events canceled. The island’s national parks and treacherous mountain routes were also closed.

After crossing Taiwan, Haikui was anticipated to proceed toward China, and authorities in the Chinese city of Shantou in Guangdong province advised residents to take precautions.

Due to Saoloa, employees in a number of Chinese cities remained at home and the start of the school year for pupils was pushed back from Friday to Monday. Trading on Hong Kong’s stock exchange was halted on Friday, and hundreds of passengers were stranded at the airport after approximately 460 flights were canceled in the region’s most important business and travel hub.

Macao leader Ho Iat Seng ordered a cease to casino operations, resulting in the closure of the cross-border bridge connecting Hong Kong, Macao, and the manufacturing base of Zhuhai.

As the storm side-swiped the densely populated financial district, the Hong Kong Observatory issued a No. 10 hurricane alert, the city’s most severe weather warning since 2018.

However, by Saturday evening, the observatory had rescinded all warnings, and tens of thousands of individuals who had sought refuge in prepared facilities were returning home.

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Recent Severe Rainfall, Flooding, and Military Tensions in China and Taiwan

taiwan-gears-up-for-typhoon-haikui-work-transport-and-classes-come-to-a-halt
Taiwan suspended flights, rail transport, and ferry services, as well as classes and outdoor events, and officials implored employees to remain at home as the island prepared for the arrival of Typhoon Haikui on Sunday evening.

In various regions, China has experienced some of its harshest rainfall and devastating flooding in recent months. Dozens of individuals have been slain, including in Beijing’s outlying mountainous regions.

The government of Hong Kong reported that various departments received reports of 1,206 uprooted trees and inundation in 18 areas. It was reported that 75 persons with storm-related injuries visited hospitals.

Despite the twin storms, China’s military maintained operations designed to intimidate Taiwan, a self-governed democracy that Beijing attempts to subjugate by force if necessary.

The Taiwanese Ministry of Defense stated that it was monitoring the movements of Chinese military aircraft and naval vessels near Taiwan. According to the report, there were no indications that any aircraft had crossed the median line in the Taiwan Strait or entered Taiwan’s air defense identification zone, as is typical.

 

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Source: ABC News

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