Nashville’s Short-Term Rental Policy Under Review Alongside Noise Ordinance

nashvilles-short-term-rental-policy-under-review-alongside-noise-ordinance

Nashville, Tennessee, may eventually implement laws governing short-term rental homes, following New York City and other municipalities. 

Because of problems with short-term rentals, the city is currently assessing the steps taken to resolve noise complaints in its downtown region.

An ordinance put forth by Metro Councilman Jeff Syracuse to lower noise levels and improve public safety recently passed. Due to the extreme noise levels in downtown Nashville, police have reported communication issues that might potentially hinder their capacity to respond to occurrences.

Businesses, including vacation rental houses, are obliged to place speakers within ten feet of open doors or windows so that sound is directed within the building. 

Music volume must be kept under 85 decibels (the noise level of a lawnmower) during business hours and even lower, at 70 dB, after hours. These decibel ranges adhere to current Metro code requirements.

The ordinance goes into force right away, and the police will evaluate its results after 90 days.

Compared to some other places, such as New York City, N.Y., Nashville’s response to noise complaints tends to be comparatively modest. 

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Nashville Tightens Short-Term Rental Laws to Address Noise and Affordable Housing Concerns

nashvilles-short-term-rental-policy-under-review-alongside-noise-ordinance
Nashville, Tennessee, may eventually implement laws governing short-term rental homes, following New York City and other municipalities.

The goal is to make downtown areas quieter in cities like Seattle, Washington, and Boston, Massachusetts, which have tightened laws on short-term rentals.

This ordinance is a part of a larger movement in American communities to combat noise and disturbance brought on by short-term rentals, which frequently involve loud parties and absentee landlords.

According to Lil’ Biz Journal, many of these localities blame loud parties and unresponsive, absentee landlords. Along with Boston, Massachusetts, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and New York City, New York, LBJ singles out Chattanooga and Memphis as two places whose new rules have altered the short-term renting landscape.

These local governments serve as a case study for Tennessee because of the radically varied ordinances in the two cities.

The August Metro Council vote in Nashville seems to be the least severe response from these cities to a widespread disturbance issue. Ballyhoo can now be dealt with by law enforcement thanks to the new ordinance.

Additionally, according to LBJ, Mayor Eric Adams of New York City recently tightened laws on short-term rentals in an effort to address a shortage of affordable housing. 

Affordable housing was a major concern for outgoing Nashville Mayor John Cooper, who had made it a part of his campaign platform.

Restrictions are additionally being enforced in New York City to address the shortage of affordable housing. Nashville’s policy may be viewed as less strict, but it represents the city’s dedication to preserving public safety and the standard of living for both citizens and visitors.

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Source: Newsbreak

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